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Yoshimitsu Chikamoto

Profile Picture

Plants, Soils, and Climate

Earth System Modeling

Assistant Professor

Educational Background

PhD, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Hokkaido University, 2005
Role of moisture eld in the large-scale surface heat exchanges
MS, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Hokkaido University, 2002
Atlantic atmosphere-ocean response to the tropical Pacic sea surface temperature variations
BS, Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Science, 2000
Ion-acoustic shock wave in a dusty plasma


Biography

Dr. Chikamoto's research focuses on understanding of physical climate processes and climate predictability.

Teaching Interests

Earth system science; Climate modeling and simulation

Research Interests

Climate variability, predictability and change.


Contact Information

Office Location: AGRS 346
DialPhone: 435-797-0832
SendEmail: yoshi.chikamoto@usu.edu

    Publications - Books & Book Chapters

      * Has not been peer reviewed

      Publications - Fact Sheets

        * Has not been peer reviewed

        Publications - Curriculum

          * Has not been peer reviewed

          Publications - Journal Articles

          * Has not been peer reviewed

          Publications - Literary Journal

            * Has not been peer reviewed

            Publications - MultiMedia

              * Has not been peer reviewed

              Publications - Technical Reports

                * Has not been peer reviewed

                Publications - Translations & Transcripts

                  Publications - Other

                    * Has not been peer reviewed

                    Scheduled Teaching

                    PSC 6890 - Plants, Soils, and Climate Graduate Seminar, Fall 2017

                    PSC 7890 - Plants, Soils, and Climate Graduate Seminar, Fall 2017

                    PSC 6900 - Special Problems in Plants, Soils, and/or Climate, Fall 2017


                    Graduate Students Mentored

                    Zachary Johnson, Plants, Soils, and Climate, August 2017

                    Credit: Y. Chikamoto

                    Tropical Trans-Basin Variability

                    Tropical trans-basin variability (TBV) is characterized by a zonal seesaw of atmosphere-ocean variations between the Pacific and the Atlantic/Indian Ocean basins (McGregor et al., 2014; Chikamoto et al., 2015). Although the tropical Pacific variability is a major driver to induce interannual-to-decadal climate variability in the other basins (Chikamoto and Tanimoto, 2005; 2006; Chikamoto et al., 2010), the atmosphere–ocean variability in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans can feed back to the Pacific through trans-basin interactions and global displacements of the Walker Circulation (Chikamoto et al., 2012; 2015). In contrast to the El Nino Southern Oscillation, the TBV shows low-frequency variations on decadal timescales because of the larger spatial scales. As a result, the TBV can be predictable up to 3 years in advance by the state-of-the-art climate prediction system. In view of the global impacts of the TBV on precipitation and sea-level anomalies, operational predictions of the TBV may translate into better assessments of risks in sectors, such as coastal and water management, forestry and agriculture.

                    Credit: F. J. Doblas-Reyes

                    Decadal Climate Prediction

                    Decadal climate prediction is a new challenge of forecasting climate conditions for upcoming several years. While global surface temperature shows a warming trend on centennial timescales associated with greenhouse gas increases, this warming trend is modulated by natural climate variability on interannual-to-decadal timescales (Mochizuki et al., 2012; Tatebe et al., 2012; Chikamoto et al., 2013; Doblas-Reyes et al., 2013). Successful decadal predictions mainly rely on long-term ocean memories, particularly in low-frequency climate phenomena in the higher latitude region, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (Mochizuki et al., 2010; Chikamoto et al., 2013; Doblas-Reyes et al., 2013). Recent works discover some decadal predictable processes of the land hydroclimate in North America (Chikamoto et al., 2015) and marine ecosystems in the North Pacific (Chikamoto et al., 2016).